Skip Navigation
Department of Health and Human Services www.hhs.gov
 
Slide Tray
0 slides

Return to Slide Library

Slides

Add Presentation to Slide Tray Presentation:

Second-Generation Antidepressants for Treating Adult Depression—An Update

Slide: 14 of 28

Adherence and Persistence in Second-Generation Antidepressants for Adults With MDD

Adherence rates in efficacy trials range between 90 and 100 percent. Results from efficacy randomized controlled trials (RCTs) did not indicate any differences in adherence among second-generation antidepressants. The evidence, however, is limited to few comparisons for which the strength of the evidence is moderate. For the majority of possible comparisons among second-generation antidepressants, the strength of the evidence is insufficient to permit conclusions about the comparative adherence. Findings from highly controlled efficacy studies may have limited applicability to real-world practice, especially because of the overall short duration of these trials. The evidence is insufficient to permit conclusions about adherence and persistence in effectiveness studies.

Comparative Adherence and Persistence of Immediate-Release Versus Extended-Release Formulations: Three studies assessed the comparative adherence of immediate-release and extended-release formulations. Based on one open-label RCT, adherence to fluoxetine weekly was higher than to fluoxetine daily; the strength of evidence for this finding is low. The only double-blinded RCT available reported no significant differences in adherence between patients treated with paroxetine IR and those receiving paroxetine CR (93% vs. 96%) over a 25-week followup period; the strength of evidence for this finding is moderate. A retrospective cohort study, based on U.S. prescription data, showed higher refill persistence for prescriptions of bupropion XL than for those of bupropion SR; the strength of evidence for this finding is low.