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Effective Health Care Program

Future Research Needs To Reduce the Risk of Primary Breast Cancer in Women

Systematic Review

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Archived: This report is greater than 3 years old. Findings may be used for research purposes, but should not be considered current.

This report is from AHRQ's series on Future Research Needs Projects.

Notice

Future Research Needs To Reduce the Risk of Primary Breast Cancer in Women was available for public comment from September 29, 2010, to October 25, 2010. In response to questions and suggestions received, and the report was revised to clarify that no incentives were offered to stakeholders to participate. Additional background was included on development of the two questionnaires. A note was added to Table 1 to explain that variations in the stakeholder perspective preassigned and the perspective self-identified by the participants led to differences in the numbers reported for allocation of participants. Table B was added to the Executive Summary to highlight priority research areas and potential study designs.

Excerpt

The 2009 comparative effectiveness review (CER) on the effectiveness of medications to reduce the risk of primary breast cancer in women without preexisting cancer demonstrated the efficacy of two SERMs, tamoxifen citrate (RR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.59 to 0.82; 4 trials) and raloxifene (RR, 0.44; CI, 0.27 to 0.71; 2 trials). However, the CER also outlined many adverse effects and unknowns about the medications. The objective of this pilot project was to engage stakeholders to develop and prioritize a list of research questions to address the research gaps related to the CER. First, our goal was to provide sufficient detail--including population, intervention, comparator, and outcome (PICO)--for researchers and funders to use in the development of research proposals and solicitations, respectively. Second, this project was intended to identify a feasible and effective approach to identify and prioritize future research from systematic reviews in general.